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Dr. R. L. Madekurozwa

Lecturer


Dr. R. L. Madekurozwa
MSc (University of London), BVSc (UZ)
E-Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Areas of Specialization: Veterinary Microbiology (Virology and Immunology)
Research Interests: Virology, zoonotic viruses of bats

Profile
Dr Madekurozwa is a Lecturer in Veterinary Microbiology and Immunology with the Department of Paraclinical Veterinary Studies. She joined the UZ in 2003. Her area of specialization is Veterinary Microbiology (Virology and Immunology). Dr Madekurozwa’s Research Interest is Virology, specifically Zoonotic Viruses of bats. She is currently pursuing her DPhil studies with the University of Zimbabwe. She worked for Government Veterinary Services for twelve years where she gained vast experience in Microbiology. She also worked as a Regional Coordinator for FAO project (Promotion of Transboundary Disease Early Warning Systems in the SADC Region).

Research Publications
1. Matope G, Bhebhe E, Muma JB, Oloya J, Madekurozwa RL, Lund A, Skjerve E (2011). Seroprevalence of brucellosis and its associated risk factors in cattle from smallholder dairy farms in Zimbabwe. Tropical Animal Health and Production,43:975-982, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-011-9794-4
2. Matope G, Makaya PV, Dhliwayo S, Gadha S, Madekurozwa RL, Pfukenyi DM (2010). A retrospective study of brucellosis seroprevalence in commercial and smallholder cattle farms of Zimbabwe. Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa, 58(4): 326-333, (http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bahpa.v58i4.64228)
3. Mavenyengwa M, Nqindi J, Madekurozwa RL, Chitate F, Muyombwe T, Ncube C (2000). Locally available grains as carriers of Newcastle Disease V4 vaccine in Zimbabwe: An experimental trial. Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal, 31(2): 45-56, (http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/zvj.v31i2.5357)
4. Dawe PS, Flanagan FO, Madekurozwa RL, Sorensen KL, Anderson EC, Foggin CM, Ferris NP, Knowles NJ (1994). Natural transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus from African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) to cattle in a wildlife area of Zimbabwe. Veterinary Record, 134: 230-232
5. Anderson EC, Foggin C, Atkinson M, Sorensen KJ, Madekurozwa RL,Nqindi J (1993). The role of wild animals, other than buffalo, in the current epidemiology of foot-and-mouth disease in Zimbabwe. Epidemiology and Infection, 111: 559-563
6. Sorensen KJ, Madekurozwa RL, Dawe P (1992). Foot-and-Mouth Disease: Detection of antibodies in cattle sera by blocking ELISA. Veterinary Microbiology, 32: 253-265

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